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Horn Field Campus

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 Horn Field Campus includes a brick lodge and three cabins, located on terrain ranging from woodlands, prairie, and farmland. The construction of the large HFC lodge is interesting in its own right. The wooden flooring is put together with pegs. Two fireplaces are located on either end of the lodge, while pickle jar lamps once hung from the California redwood beams that cross the ceiling. Intricate ironwork adorned the doors of the lodge, showing off the skilled art of the craftsmen who had worked on the buildings. “If a person were to try to duplicate the buildings today, he couldn’t do it for less than $500,000,” according to Frank Horn in a 1965 Western Courier article.

Several HFC buildings were constructed during the Depression, when the property was owned by the William Bacon family. Given the economic conditions, Bacon was able to hire expert craftsmen cheaply to build “modern for the time” structures. One original cabin was constructed of walnut and a fireplace with a “built–in ice cooler” next to it. By simply removing a loose stone to expose the cooler, guests could have cold refreshments. Unfortunately, that cabin was destroyed by fire and when it was rebuilt, walnut was not used nor was the cabin’s unique cooler replaced.

 

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Horn Field Campus (HFC) is a unit of Western Illinois University’s College of Education and Human Services administered by the Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Administration.

 

 Horn Field Campus includes a brick lodge and three cabins, located on terrain ranging from woodlands, prairie, and farmland. The construction of the large HFC lodge is interesting in its own right. The wooden flooring is put together with pegs. Two fireplaces are located on either end of the lodge, while pickle jar lamps once hung from the California redwood beams that cross the ceiling. Intricate ironwork adorned the doors of the lodge, showing off the skilled art of the craftsmen who had worked on the buildings. “If a person were to try to duplicate the buildings today, he couldn’t do it for less than $500,000,” according to Frank Horn in a 1965 Western Courier article.

Several HFC buildings were constructed during the Depression, when the property was owned by the William Bacon family. Given the economic conditions, Bacon was able to hire expert craftsmen cheaply to build “modern for the time” structures. One original cabin was constructed of walnut and a fireplace with a “built–in ice cooler” next to it. By simply removing a loose stone to expose the cooler, guests could have cold refreshments. Unfortunately, that cabin was destroyed by fire and when it was rebuilt, walnut was not used nor was the cabin’s unique cooler replaced.

 

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